What the immigration battle could look like under Donald Trump

By on
Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks to supporters as he takes the stage for a campaign event in Dallas, Monday, Sept. 14, 2015. (AP Photo/LM Otero)

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks to supporters as he takes the stage for a campaign event in Dallas, Monday, Sept. 14, 2015. (AP Photo/LM Otero)

The high stakes battle over immigration policy has politicians and thinkers on all sides of the spectrum preparing for battles that could last years — leaving millions of people in the US unsure of whether they’ll be able to stay in the country.

The President-elect has made immigration a focal point throughout his campaign, from his first announcement that he was running in the 2016 race — where he immediately sparked controversy with accusations that some Mexican immigrants were criminals and rapists.

From pledging to build a wall along the Mexican border to saying he would mass-deport millions of immigrants living in the US illegally and saying he would block foreign Muslims from entering the country (a position he later moderated), Trump has repeatedly pledged a hard-line stance on immigration as one of the key reasons to vote for him.

The hard-line statements with shifting details have left millions of Americans uncertain about their future status in the US. More than 700,000 undocumented immigrants who came to the US as children are protected currently by a deferred action program established by President Barack Obama, and another 4 million to 5 million were eligible for protection under a similar program for parents of US citizens and lawful residents that was blocked by federal courts. Many of the families’ information could be in federal systems, allowing for targeted removal under a Trump administration.

Since being elected, Trump has signaled he may take a softer approach on some issues rather than the strident tone he struck during the campaign.

“We’re going to work something out that’s going to make people happy and proud,” Trump told Time magazine about the so-called DREAMers, young people brought to the US as children who meet certain education and work requirements. “They got brought here at a very young age, they’ve worked here, they’ve gone to school here. Some were good students. Some have wonderful jobs. And they’re in never-never land because they don’t know what’s going to happen.

-CNN

ABOUT: Nana Kwesi Coomson

[email protected]

A Freelance Journalist, Entrepreneur and Philanthropist. Editor-in-Chief of www.233times.com. A contributory writer for Ghanaian Chronicle Newspaper. An alumnus of Adisadel College where he read General Arts. He holds first degree in Bachelor of Arts from the University of Ghana; Political Science (major) and History (minor). He has also pursued MSc Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) and Energy with Public Relations (PR) at the Robert Gordon University in the United Kingdom. His mentors are Rupert Murdoch, Warren Buffet, Sam Jonah, Kwaku Sakyi Addo and Piers Morgan

view all posts by: Nana Kwesi Coomson  

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

ABOUT 233TIMES

233times.com is a Ghanaian media house which serves as a major source of exclusive interviews ,music and video downloads, news and more.

233times.com reports on major events,news covering entertainment, politics, sports, etc from within Ghana, Africa and beyond.

We have a platform for the amateur artistes to portray their staggering talents ...more...

WE ON SOCIAL MEDIA. FOLLOW US

facebook twitter youtube google plus linkedIn

To advertise with us or make enquiries, please visit 233times.com/advertise or call +233249455142 (Selorm), +233248185848 (Nana Kwesi)